Ludlow Palmers
helping to conserve the fabric and treasures of St Laurence's
Chancel

Architecture

The Chancel was built in three phases. The western part as far as the end of the choir stalls was within the volume of the church of 1199. The next part to the altar rail was added in the thirteenth century. In the 1440s the chancel was extended by one further bay with the earlier parts being completely remodelled in the Perpendicular style to create a unified whole. ...read more...

The Roof

The Chancel Roof has a shallow pitch in keeping with the period of its construction. The five bays are divided by tie beams on moulded arch braces with kingposts supporting the ridge beams. Each bay has eight main panels each divided into a further four. ...read more...

The Stalls

The stalls were for the use during the mass and were designed with seats that tipped up with a ledge to support a weary worshipper who had stood for too long. The carved brackets under the ledges are called misericords.

The stalls were constructed in two phases. ...read more...

Misericords

The misericords are the carvings under the seats of the stalls. St Laurence's collection of 29 is one of the largest for a parish church and was described by Sir Nicklaus Pevsner as “interesting and entertaining”. ...read more...

The Sanctuary

The Sanctuary is the raised area behind the altar rail. For details of the reredos, sacristy, sedilia, piscina and Easter Sepulchre. ...read more...

Ambrosia Sidney Monument

Ambrosia Sidney, 4th daughter of Sir Henry Sidney died in 1574 aged 9. Her tomb is dated 1580 and stands on the south side of chancel. Elaborate monuments to children at this time were uncommon, unless they were heirs or heiresses, and, although Henry commissioned monuments to two of her older sisters, this seems an extraordinary display of parental love. ...read more...

The Townshend Monument

The substantial tomb chest, with painted effigies of Sir Robert Townshend and his wife, and figures of their twelve children around the sides, is set within an arched recess on the north side of the chancel, close to the altar. Townshend, who died in 1556, was the second son of a significant Norfolk gentry family. ...read more...

The Walter Monument

This large tomb enclosed by railings is on the south side of the chancel, next to the tomb of Ambrosia Sidney.

Walter, 1518-1594, came from Staffordshire, trained as a lawyer and was recommended to Sir Henry Sidney for the Council of the Marches. ...read more...

The Waties Monument

The wall monument to the Waties is on the north side of the chancel. This type of memorial became popular from the later 16th century among professional people as it was less expensive or space consuming than the grand tomb chest

Edward Waties came from a local family based at Burway. He was a member of the Council of the Marches and had a minor legal role as a steward. His arms were among those displayed at Ludlow castle. ...read more...

The Salwey Monument

The monument to Theophilus Salwey is situated on the north side of the Chancel. It was designed by Robert Taylor, a prominent London architect of the time, in the Roccoco style, with much imagery reflective of the 'Age of Enlightenment'. ...read more...

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